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hobie16
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Post by hobie16 » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:00 pm

Julie Victoire Daubié's 194th Birthday

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Today’s Doodle celebrates Julie-Victoire Daubié: journalist, activist, and the first woman to obtain a bachelor's degree in France.

When Daubié was born, in 1824, the law didn't explicitly ban women from getting college degrees, but prevailing cultural norms and a lack of resources made it almost impossible. With her brother’s help, she studied Latin, Greek, history, geography, and German, and was eventually able to become a governess. Her frustrations with sexism and inequality motivated her to write the essay "The Poor Women of the 19th century", and its success propelled Daubié to register for and gain admittance to the Baccalauréat in Letters.

Daubié went on to fight for women's rights throughout the rest of her life. Today we celebrate her courage and perseverance in the face of adversity.

Bonne Fête, Julie Victoire Daubié!


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Don't be fooled by appearances. In Hawaii, some of the most powerful people look like bums and stuntmen.
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Re: Google

Post by hobie16 » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:00 pm

Hannah Glasse’s 310th Birthday

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If the thought of Yorkshire pudding and gooseberry fool makes your mouth water, you have Hannah Glasse to thank for making these two delectable dishes staples in English cuisine. Born on this day in 1708, Glasse was a pioneering English cook and author of the most popular cookbook of the 18th century. Published in 1747, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy was unique; it was one of the first cookbooks written in a simple and conversational style, which meant that any English speaker and reader – regardless of their class – could learn how to cook.

Glasse’s cookbook was popular not only because it was easy to read, but also because of its massive scope. It included a whopping 972 recipes, covering everything from puddings and soups, to what to serve at Lent, to preparing food for the sick.

Today’s Doodle features Glasse whipping up a batch of classic Yorkshire puddings. Her recipe for Yorkshire pudding, among many others, is one of the earliest known ever published.

Happy 310th birthday, Hannah Glasse!


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Don't be fooled by appearances. In Hawaii, some of the most powerful people look like bums and stuntmen.
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Re: Google

Post by hobie16 » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:01 pm

Mario Pani’s 107th Birthday

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Rome was not built in a day, and neither was Mexico’s architectural jewel, Mexico City. Today, the city is renowned as a beacon of modern design, but many of its prominent buildings can be traced back to the 20th century when visionary talents shaped the country’s capital into a mega metropolis. Primary among these was Mario Pani.

Born in Mexico City on this day in 1911, Pani studied architecture both in his home country and Paris, France. From the 1930s through the 1960s, he developed some of Mexico’s most emblematic buildings, always with an eye towards urban growth.

Pani changed the face of the city with the suburban area of Ciudad Satélite (developed with Domingo Garcia Ramos and Jose Luis Cuevas) and various complexes including: the housing project Multifamilar Miguel Alemán tower blocks, the main campus of of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (U.N.A.M.), the Unidad Habitacional Nonoalco-Tlatelolco (inspired by pioneering architect Le Corbusier), the National Conservatory of Music, and the Nonoalco Tlatelolco Urban Complex (his most extensive residential complex, featuring the mosaic-emblazoned Insignia Tower).

Today’s Doodle was created by Mario Pani’s son, artist Knut Pani, who references some of the structures inextricably linked to his father. Knut explains: “The buildings are part of the Tlatelolco Urban Center in Mexico City (12,000 apartments in 102 buildings) and its triangular tower, so characteristic of M.P. The curved element is symbolic of Pani's housing projects of the 1940's."

Happy 107th birthday, Mario Pani!


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Don't be fooled by appearances. In Hawaii, some of the most powerful people look like bums and stuntmen.
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Re: Google

Post by hobie16 » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:02 pm

Anandi Gopal Joshi’s 153rd Birthday

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In 1886, a young doctor stepped off a ship from America, eager to take up the role of physician in charge of the female ward at Kolhapur’s Albert Edward Hospital. Not only was she India’s first female doctor, but she was only 19 years old at the time. Her name was Anandi Gopal Joshi, and her story is one of courage and perseverance.

Joshi was married at the age of nine, as was the custom in 19th century India. Her husband encouraged her to continue her education and her interest in medicine. At sixteen, battling ill-health but determined to succeed, Joshi set sail for America. She earned her medical degree from the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (now known as Drexel University College of Medicine) and returned to India with dreams of opening a medical college for women.

Joshi’s young life was tragically cut short when she died of tuberculosis before her 22nd birthday. However, her legacy and the path she paved for generations of women continues today. Interestingly, even a crater on Venus is named after her!

Today’s Doodle is created by Bangalore-based artist Kashmira Sarode who imagines Joshi celebrating her degree.

Happy Birthday, Anandi Gopal Joshi!


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Don't be fooled by appearances. In Hawaii, some of the most powerful people look like bums and stuntmen.
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Re: Google

Post by hobie16 » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:03 pm

Francisco Balagtas’ 230th Birthday

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When Francisco Balagtas was born outside of Manila in 1788, one of four children and the son of a blacksmith, few might have guessed he would grow up to be one of the most revered writers in the Philippines. But in fact, Balagtas showed promise early on, and even studied under José de la Cruz, one of the most prominent Filipino poets.

Balagtas' most famous work, depicted in today's Doodle, is Florante at Laura, an epic poem that symbolizes his own life journey. In the first panel, we see Balagtas working on Florante at Laura. The story begins with a view on the main character, Duke Florante of Albania, who has just been exiled and tied to a tree. The third panel depicts his love, Princess Laura, being held captive. Next we meet Prince Aladdin of Persia, himself exiled from his own country. In the fifth panel, Aladdin's fiancée Flerida searches for him in the forest before rescuing Laura. Finally, Laura and Florante are reunited and rule peacefully over Albania.


In addition to being a highly-skilled poet, Balagtas earned acclaim for writing in Tagalog (most writings at the time were in Spanish) and including Filipino themes, even though the characters were not from the Philippines. Students around the country still learn of the adventures of Florante and Laura today, as well as the rhythm and meter of the poem.

Today we celebrate the author’s legacy on what would be his 230th birthday.


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Don't be fooled by appearances. In Hawaii, some of the most powerful people look like bums and stuntmen.
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Re: Google

Post by hobie16 » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:03 pm

Nazia Hassan’s 53rd Birthday

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When young Pakistani girls in the 1980s closed their eyes and clutched a pretend mic in their hands, swaying and singing, a major inspiration was Nazia Hassan. Hassan, sometimes referred to as the “Princess of Pop”, was a sensation the likes of which hadn’t been seen in the region in years. Young and graceful, with long flowing hair, she charmed the country by belting out favorite songs “Disco Deewane” and “Boom Boom” alongside her brother Zohaib.

Born on April 3, 1965 in Karachi, she met London producer Kumar at the age of 15 and recorded a Bollywood hit, “Aap jaisa koi” for the blockbuster “Qurbani.” The song catapulted her into the stardom and won her a Filmfare award. From there, Hassan and her brother released a number of albums, including “Boom Boom” in 1982 and “Young Tarang” in 1984. She was the first Pakistani singer to reach the British charts with her English version of “Disco Deewane”, called “Dreamer Deewane.”

Hassan was not only a talented singer, but also a devoted scholar and humanitarian. Using her law degree, she worked at the U.N. as well as for UNICEF. She was passionate about the rights of young people, and often took the time to visit impoverished schools in Pakistan. Her life was tragically cut short by lung cancer at the age of 35.

Our Doodle today imagines her performing with her famous flowing hair and dupatta (traditional Pakistani scarf), and the disco balls of the 80s glinting behind her.

Happy 53rd birthday, Nazia Hassan!


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Don't be fooled by appearances. In Hawaii, some of the most powerful people look like bums and stuntmen.
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Re: Google

Post by hobie16 » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:04 pm

Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay’s 115th Birthday

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Today we celebrate Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay: freedom fighter, art enthusiast, social activist, actor, youth leader, and forward-thinking women’s movement organizer (and all in one lifetime!).

Chattopadhyay’s contributions to India were numerous. Though widely known for persuading Mahatma Gandhi to call upon women to march with him in the Indian Independence Movement in the early 20th century, she is also credited for reinvigorating the culture of Indian handicrafts, handlooms, and theatre, and for using cooperative grassroots movements to pave the way for a higher socioeconomic standard for Indian women around the country.

Chattopadhyay had a career of ‘firsts’ - from being the first woman to run for Legislative office to setting up some of the first national institutions to archive, protect, and promote Indian dance, drama, art, puppetry, music, and handicrafts. She was also one of the few women of her time to propose that women’s rights, religious freedoms, environmental justice, political independence, and civil rights are all interrelated movements.

Today’s Doodle by Finland-based Desi artist Parvati Pillai depicts Chattopadhyay surrounded by many of the cultural objects and practices she fought to elevate and protect, including the bhangra, the sitar, the sarangi, Karthak dance, Chhau dance, embroidery, basket weaving, and Kathaputli.

Happy 115th birthday, Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay!


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Don't be fooled by appearances. In Hawaii, some of the most powerful people look like bums and stuntmen.
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Re: Google

Post by hobie16 » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:05 pm

John Harrison’s 325th Birthday

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It’s been said that necessity is the mother of invention, and without a doubt, British horologist John Harrison brought that age-old proverb to life.

Born on this day in 1693, in Foulby, Yorkshire, England, Harrison was a self-educated clockmaker and carpenter who came to the rescue of countless sailors by creating the first marine chronometer to calculate longitude at sea.

Seeking to remedy naval disasters, the British government created the Board of Longitude in 1714, which offered a reward of £20,000 to anyone who could devise a navigational instrument that could find the longitude within 30 miles of a sea voyage.

Harrison took on the challenge. He set to work on his chronometer in 1728 and completed it in 1735, following up this feat with three watches that were even smaller and more on the money than his first.

Harrison’s extraordinary invention brought him much acclaim. Thanks to him, seamen could determine not only gauge latitude but longitude, making their excursions far safer.

Our colorful Doodle shows the inventor hard at work, surrounded by the tools of his trade. Today, time is on his side.

Happy 325th birthday, John Harrison!


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Don't be fooled by appearances. In Hawaii, some of the most powerful people look like bums and stuntmen.
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Re: Google

Post by hobie16 » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:16 pm

Dr. Maya Angelou’s 90th Birthday

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See video at https://www.google.com/doodles/dr-maya- ... h-birthday

“I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did,
but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

-Dr. Maya Angelou

In a life rich with experiences and stories, author, poet, memoirist, and activist Dr. Maya Angelou touched the lives of millions around the globe through her teachings, her writings, her voice, and her actions.

Born Marguerite Annie Johnson in 1928, her incredible story began with tragedy when a sexual assault at the age of seven rendered her mute for five years. During those years, however, books and poetry became her solace and constant companions, eventually helping her find her voice again to embark upon an intellectual and creative journey that defies description.

In her her teens and early adult life Dr. Angelou saw more experiences than many do in a lifetime: from motherhood, to becoming San Francisco’s first female and black streetcar conductor, to touring the world as a cast member of the opera Porgy and Bess — all while mastering several languages. She sang and danced in professional cabarets, worked as a journalist in Africa, and became one of the most prominent civil rights activists of her generation.

The success of her first book, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” in 1969 brought her mainstream attention as an author. Six other autobiographical works followed, in addition to poetry, children’s literature, and non-fiction (even cookbooks!).

Through her works, Dr. Angelou gave a voice to millions. She championed women’s rights and gender equality. She redefined black beauty and celebrated African-American oral traditions. She advocated against war and campaigned for universal peace.

She was also the recipient of numerous honors during her lifetime. She became the first poet to make an inaugural recitation in three decades when Bill Clinton became President in 1992. Her vast impact on popular culture was also felt through a host of award nominations, public accolades, and more than 50 honorary degrees.

Today’s video Doodle celebrates Dr. Maya Angelou on what would have been her 90th birthday. Set to her poem “Still I Rise,” the Doodle includes her own voice along with the voices of other individuals whose lives she has inspired, and who aspire to live by her legacy today.

Special thanks to these project partners who include (in order of appearance):
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​“Maya Angelou, I love her so much. Everything she represented as a woman, her creativity, her story, who she is. She was a renaissance woman of all types, she recreated though levels, all angles, all places in her mind. She is brilliant...I am honored to be able to say her words."
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"Being around Maya was so powerful and inspiring. I count myself very blessed to be one of the ones chosen to be a part of this. For some reason she took a liking to me and went out of her way to extend herself to me and I am forever grateful for that."
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"Dr. Angelou's work is filled with such incredible wisdom and spiritual teachings. It feels like the ultimate privilege to have the opportunity to speak her words. She is a national treasure we should always celebrate.”
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“Maya Angelou is not what she has done or written or spoken, it's how she did it all. She moved through the world with unshakeable calm, confidence, and a fiery, fierce grace and abounding love.”


Here’s to Dr. Maya Angelou for her courage, compassion, and words, which continue to inspire hope around the world.


Special thanks to Dr. Angelou’s son Guy Johnson and his wife Stephanie Floyd-Johnson for their close partnership on this project. Below, Guy shares his personal thoughts on his mother and her legacy:

As we spend what would have been my mother’s ninetieth birthday, I think of her melodious tones speaking about the need for tolerance, understanding, forgiveness and love. My mother’s perspective was that human beings being social animals are strongest when they are unified. She saw hatred and greed, not only as divisive, but as the forces of evil. She recognized that unlike positive virtues, neither greed nor hatred has to be taught; they come naturally and have to be untaught in order to free their possessor of their burdensome weight and baggage. She saw one of our greatest challenges was learning to love ourselves, then having the courage and the wisdom to love others. She often said, “We don’t know how or why love occurs. Truthfully, we don’t know that even gravity isn’t a kind of love.” She felt that love was one of the most important emotions and was an instrumental key to unlocking the inner doors of our ignorance and fear.

My mother’s principal message was one of inclusiveness; that despite our ethnic, religious and cultural differences, we are more alike than unalike. She saw all our differences in language, orientation and perspective as an indication of the richness of our imagination and creativity, and as elements of our nature that we should celebrate. She believed that we are all images of God, no matter how we look or what name we use to call upon the Divine and Sacred Being.

She saw that the world was in need of our attention and effort; from the hunger and poverty that are present in so many countries, to our wars, internecine conflicts and indiscriminate terroristic acts, to the destructive pollution, deforestation and the reduction of the biodiversity of the life forms around us. Our planet is crying out for help. My mother would say, ‘Don’t just complain about the problems you see and do nothing; roll up your sleeves and get to work finding solutions and remedies. We do a disservice to our children and to the future by not addressing the problems that confront us. Nor should our efforts for change be thwarted or stifled by the obstacles arrayed against us. We must steel ourselves with courage and perseverance and battle on for what is right.” For my mother the most important virtue was courage, because without courage none of the other virtues can be practiced consistently.

My mother did not herself go to college to pursue a degree. Although, as she rose in stature, as a public figure she was awarded Honorary Doctorates by more than fifty major universities and colleges. She understood education was extremely important; to that end she was a voracious reader, consuming two to three books a week from the time she was a teenager until her vision failed in her eighties. She used to ask me, “Can you imagine what the world would be like if all children on earth had access to a good education and were allowed to let their inner lights glow? Oh, we would have the cure to cancer and remedies to most of the major problems that confront us. The knowledge that would be generated by that level of brain power would give us access to the stars, to the universe as well as to our dreams.”

My mother’s assessment of human beings was that we were neither gods nor demons, but that we carried elements of both within ourselves; that the onus was upon each of us to control the demons of anger, jealousy and hate and find the spirit of a caring and forgiving God within our souls.


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Don't be fooled by appearances. In Hawaii, some of the most powerful people look like bums and stuntmen.
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Re: Google

Post by hobie16 » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:17 pm

María Félix’s 104th Birthday

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When an important Mexican filmmaker first approached Maria Félix about an acting career, she responded: “When I want to, it will be through the big door.” Félix would launch a film career on her terms, even turning down Hollywood magnate Cecil B. Demille to debut in her home country where she would become an icon of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema.

Born in 1914, Maria Félix grew up modestly in Álamos, Sonora, Mexico among 11 siblings. During her teen years, her family moved to Guadalajara where Félix was crowned Beauty Queen at the University of Guadalajara. She got her break after moving to Mexico City, starring in El Peñón de las Ánimas (1942). Her offscreen defiance of famous co-star Jorge Negrete earned her the reputation for toughness that followed her throughout her life and career.

Maria Félix’s contributions to international culture are prolific. In addition to releasing 47 films in Mexico, Spain, France, Italy, and Argentina, she was considered a muse by famous artists like José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera, novelists and playwrights like Jean Cocteau, Renato Leduc, and Carlos Fuentes, and musicians like Juan Gabriel and Francis Cabrel. She was also a fashion icon, wearing clothes and jewelry designed expressly for her by famous designers like Christian Dior and Cartier Paris.

Though her career started in Mexican cinema, Maria Félix’s impact on cinema, art, music, and fashion reverberates overseas, transcending barriers to establish her as extremely influential female voice in international cinema. Created by guest artist Paulette Jo, today’s Doodle captures the stunning movie icon’s portraiture.

Happy 104th birthday to Maria Félix, a cinematic pioneer!


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Don't be fooled by appearances. In Hawaii, some of the most powerful people look like bums and stuntmen.
--- Matt King

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